Pain, Injury and Load Management - A Case for 'Correctives'

Pain, Injury and Load Management -  A Case for 'Correctives'

For the most part, as soon as tissue tolerance is exceeded an injury will occur. Gradual increase in load exposure over time will strengthen the tissue allowing for a greater tolerance and greater exposure. Exposure to too much load, too quickly and you are back to square one, either in pain or injured. Many factors will influence the tissue tolerance at any one point in time.

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Side Lying Archer

Side Lying Archer

When we look upstream on those who present with shoulder impingement presentations we quite often see a reduced function of one, or all, of these proximal joints. This quite often means that taking the arm through full ranges of overhead movements, as required for the Side Lying Windmill, results in pain at the anterior/ superior shoulder so it is not a great tool to use in these situations.

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Anatomical Structure Dictates Anatomical Function

Anatomical Structure Dictates Anatomical Function

The rotator cuff does however have great control of the arthrokinematics (sliding, gliding rocking and rolling of the ‘ball’ on the ‘socket’) of the gleno-humeral joint throughout larger, more global movements patterns of osteokinematics. This is a result of the structure of their insertion points on the humerus:

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Assessing the Squat

Assessing the Squat

Are the forearms and shins parallel? The wider stance should allow for a deeper, more upright squat. If there is little improvement from assessment 1 you will need further assessments to determine the restriction. We would recommend looking at ankle dorsiflexion and thoracic extension. If there are significant improvements it is more than likely representative of improve core/ hip stability in the wider position and less dorsiflexion requirement.

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The Pull:Push Ratio is WRONG | Jamie Smith

The Pull:Push Ratio is WRONG | Jamie Smith

A fundamental principle of most strength and conditioning programs is the “pull to push ratio”. This principle dictates that you must balance out your pressing volumes with pulling volumes as to not create muscular imbalances within the body.

In theory, this understanding makes sense. If all you do is bench, dumbbell press and half range push ups with no direct rowing or pulling you are on the fast track to shoulder pain and injury. However, when you break down the osteokinematics...

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